Private Workshop: National Renewable Energy Laboratory

September 5, 2017 — Please see your agenda for detailed times and locations.

A team from the Alda Center will visit the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to help researchers learn to communicate more effectively with people outside their field, including the general public, policy makers, the media, students, potential employers or funders, and prospective collaborators in other disciplines. Through discussion and practice, we will focus on fundamental skills — knowing your audience, connecting with your audience, and speaking clearly and conversationally about your work and why it matters. This event is private, with participation by invitation only.

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Workshop Instructor(s)
Graham Chedd's picture

Graham Chedd

Visiting Professor

Graham Chedd is a Visiting Professor at the Alda Center. He was a member of the team that founded NOVA in the early 1970s, and was that series’ first science editor and later producer. He co-founded the Chedd-Angier Production Company, where he produced over 100 hours of science television for PBS, including 11 seasons of Scientific American Frontiers and the miniseries The Human Spark and Brains on Trial, all hosted by Alan Alda.

JRea's picture

James Rea

Instructor

James Rea is a communications coach and consultant who specializes in helping scientists, engineers, and other technical experts reach their key audiences with clear, engaging stories. James started on this path nearly 20 years ago, when he took on a communications role with the U.S. EPA’s Design for the Environment Program. 

Terry Greiss's picture

Terry Greiss

Instructor

Along with his work as an Alda-certified instructor, Terry’s theater background spans a career of 50 years. As the founder of Brooklyn’s Irondale Ensemble, he has taught hundreds of actors and non-actors to use improvisation as a tool of enhanced communication; building bridges that help us better understand each other. Aside from his continued work on stage, he can be sometimes be seen on TV. Terry also created To Protect, Serve and Understand, an improv training program for New York City police officers, to help them communicate more effectively with community members.